Issue 8 Feature: Erika Chapman

Our blog is an extension of the issue so we can share even more experimental, beautiful work with our readers!

Benny, 2021
6×6″ acrylic, ink and graphite on plexiglass
Private collection
Sunny, 2021
6×6″ acrylic, ink and graphite on plexiglass
Private collection
Siriah fka Tallulah, 2021
12×12″ acrylic, ink and graphite on plexiglass
 Private collection

Bio: Erika Chapman is an artist best known for her expressionistic paintings of house cats, from sweet souls to ridiculous beings belly up on the floor, the ancient, the otherworldly and the predators made all of teeth and claws.

TINY TALKS WITH MAGGIE RUE HESS

Tiny Talks is an interview series with Tiny Spoon’s talented contributors. This week we spoke with Maggie Rue Hess from Issue 8, Cut/Copy/Paste: The Original! Read her poem, “At the adult beginner online Spanish night class” in our eighth issue!

Tiny Spoon: What kindles your creativity?

Maggie: Reading the phenomenal work of other writers – particularly other poets – lights a fire for me. Most recently I read Morgan Parker’s Magical Negro, and even though I can’t write what or how she writes, just absorbing her words stirred me into an active, creative mode. Also, forcing myself into action – creativity rarely strikes me out of the blue, but is rather produced from curated focus and effort.

Tiny Spoon: Are there any artists/ heroines/  idols/ friends that you look up to?

Maggie: I have an inspiring group of friends in my graduate program, and I was lucky enough to be in a workshop with them a year ago. That space actually enabled me to write the poem the Tiny Spoon published, which just speaks to the value of community when it comes to writing. My all-time idols are Mary Oliver and Toni Morrison, whose writing never fails to move me.

Tiny Spoon: Are there any natural entities that move your work?

Maggie: Rain and sunshine, in their turns. I’m basically a houseplant.

Tiny Spoon: We love insight into the creative process. Could you share what it is like for you, either with your work that appears in Tiny Spoon or in general?

Maggie: One key to my process is my Germ Pile. I think most people, writers or not, keep a note on their phone with interesting sentences, phrases, or moments – mine is called my Germ Pile, a name borrowed form my undergraduate advisor. Every scrap of thought and writing has potential, so I document the ones that interest me in the Germ Pile, which I return to when I sit down to write. Additionally, I keep a notebook dedicated to drafting poems in the living room next to a cup full of pens and markers. I want to have anything I need within reach.

Tiny Spoon: Do you have any current or future projects that you are working on that you would like to share?

Maggie: My current/on-going project is pulling together a chapbook!

Tiny Spoon: What book, artwork, music, etc., would you recommend to others?

In compiling this list, I think that I have to theme it “Main Character Energy” –

Book: Sorry I’m Late, I Didn’t Want to Come by Jessica Pan

Artwork: anything by Kallen Mikel (check out her work on IG @_kallenmikel )

Music: “So Hot You’re Hurting My Feelings” by Caroline Polachek

Tiny Spoon: Is there anything else you would like others to know about you, your creations, or beyond?

Maggie: Funny enough, last year I took a Spanish class. This year I’m taking a German course. At some point I’ll figure out how not to be monolingual.

Tiny Spoon: Where can people learn more about what you do?

Maggie: Instagram is my favorite of the apps: @maggieruehess

I have also participated in Lexington Poetry Month for a few years, and you can read more of my poems from that project here.

Issue 8 Features: Urhamish Ansari

Our 8th Issue is packed full of exciting artists and writers! Our blog is an extension of the issue so we can share even more experimental, beautiful work with our readers!

As an artist I work to develop sculptures that speak to me and to others as well. The reason why I produce art is that I love to communicate with the world through my work. My whole idea revolves around human’s life. The thing which gained my attention is “human condition” interprets both negative and positive aspects of being human. Art is the carrier of human condition and has always reflected different aspects of human life and has been representing changes in the world in different ways. This work started with the content of the human condition, which compose the essentials of human existence. 

It is basically a concern for human nature, human society, how we live our lives and how it is changing. Whenever there is talk about man, the first thing that comes into discussion is society, social behaviors and social patterns. Social behavior constantly changes as one continues to grow and develop. As humans continue to gain social information, their behavior changes accordingly.  Social structure is not stable. It responds to changes in culture, economics, technology, group relationship, social needs and priorities. The structure of our society has changed a lot throughout the centuries. Over time our priorities and goals have changed. In today’s world the survival of humans is quite difficult because it’s getting more advanced and complex. The growing industry, economy and technology has influenced our world due to which everyone has to struggle for their survival.

Human flocking as a topic is selected to observe human behavior in a race in a society looking for a reasonable rank among others. During my Studies and Professional life, I found out that humans are struggling in every aspect of life. There is a race to move ahead, there is competition to be part of any group or race. It is the main core of any survival of an individual in any group. You have to compete against each other. You have to fight for things to get things in order. You are working to survive to achieve something that is recognized to be a valuable part of any group. 

I choose a flock of humans, as my topic which elaborate my thinking and my research. I choose this to further depict in my artwork to better understand. Why do humans follow each other? Why are humans working in a race? Why do humans not care about other things like getting out of the race? Why do they have to follow or copy other members to survive? Why they need other groups to support others.

Bio: I am Urhamish. Born in Multan, Punjab on 19 December 1991. Recently completed my MPhil from Punjab university, majoring in sculpture. Exhibited my work in various group shows nationally internationally (Pak- Malaysian international Art Exhibition PMIX). I displayed my work in collateral events of Lahore biennale and recently my work was displayed in international Art and Design collaboration virtual program series 2020. Currently I am doing job at MCA (Multan college of art), NCBA&E and Institute of blue pottery Multan as a visiting lecturer. I live in Multan but currently working in Lahore. I worked in different mediums and love to explore new methods and techniques in sculpture.  

TINY TALKS WITH ISABELLE DUVERGER

Tiny Talks is an interview series with Tiny Spoon’s talented contributors. This week we spoke with Isabelle Duverger from Issue 8, Cut/Copy/Paste: The Original! Find her artwork, “Handwriting” and “The Other” in our eighth issue!

Tiny Spoon: What kindles your creativity?

Isabelle: I think we are in a connected world, where inspiration comes from our surrounding, whether it is emotions, the physical environment, people. It is a constant feed, and I try to be a translator.

Tiny Spoon: Are there any artists/ heroines/ idols/ friends that you look up to?

Isabelle: A lot of my friends are artists I admire, starting with Laia Cabrera, Sophie Thiam, Claire Poisson. And of course, inspirational women, such as Maya Angelou, Louise Bourgeois, Niki de Saint Phalle, Romaine Brooks, Simone Veil…

Tiny Spoon: We love insight into the creative process. Could you share what it is like for you, either with your work that appears in Tiny Spoon or in general?

Isabelle: My work either come from an image I construct in my mind, or an emotion I would like to convey. The second speaks to the two collages that are published in Tiny Spoon – Issue 8, “Handwriting” and “The Other”, as well as my latest painting series “Love #”. I seek to be descriptive of an emotion, which is intangible, a longing.

Tiny Spoon: Do you have any current or future projects that you are working on that you would like to share?

Isabelle: “Love #” is the latest work I have been working on during the pandemic, born from the need to be closer physically, while social distancing. The series portrays the affection, the love between two women. It is sensual without being sexual. The lines formed by the bodies are created to convey harmony, balance, and connection. The absence of features makes them anonymous but at the same time allows one to identify freely.

Isabelle: The colors are minimalistic, gold, silver and black matte. As they reflect their environment, the paintings are alive and evolve throughout the day, focusing on the gesture of the two women, and the shapes and energy of the lines. The shapes of the body are generous, powerful and sensual, as a reference to the Nanas of Niki de Saint Phalle.

The symbolic use of gold brings a sacred feeling of light and elevation to the intimacy of these women.

Isabelle: As a queer artist, the subject is of course a personal and emotional one. Two women together are often portrayed as sexual objects, or their sexual drive is put in the forefront. I wanted to paint the love and the care that these two women have for one another in their intimacy, the sensuality they communicate in the closeness to one another, but most of all, convey their love.

Isabelle: I also created with Laia Cabrera and immersive interactive video and sound installation named “Dream-e-scape”. It just opened at Flutter Art Gallery in Los Angeles and will be there a year.

Tiny Spoon: What book, artwork, music, etc., would you recommend to others?

Isabelle: Books: Marie Ndiaye – Three Strong Women is a work that has impacted me a lot, as well as Maya Angelou – The Heart of a Woman

I am completely obsessed with the soundtrack of Obsession, and its variations for Brass. And everything Arooj Aftab.

Artwork is a difficult one, so much to think about. I love immersive installations, in particular “Forêt” of Eva Jospin. I saw recently the work of Urs Fisher “Untitled (Hanging Branches)” which also impacted me, the feeling of time passing, and what remains.

Tiny Spoon: Is there anything else you would like others to know about you, your creations, or beyond?

Isabelle: No idea… I am a French artist based in the US where I lived for fifteen years already. I come back to France often, to Paris and mostly the countryside to refill myself with inspiration and nature. It is an essential part of my creative process.

Tiny Spoon: Where can people learn more about what you do?

Isabelle: My website: isabelleduverger.com and Instagram: @isabelleduverger

Issue 8 Features: Zareen Ashraf

Our blog is an extension of the issue so we can share even more experimental, beautiful work with our readers!

Untitled | size: 6”x 11.5” | paper on paper

 Untitled | size: 8”x 13.5” | paper on paper

 Soliloquy | size: 11.5”x 13.5” | paper on paper

A wish | size: 8”x 11” | paper on paper

     Soliloquy | size: 8.5”x 11” | paper on paper

Artist Statement: My work is the response to the events occurs in life. I use symbols to generalize the idea. This work depicts the subconscious. Our subconscious mind contains a lot of stuff which we observe, see, hear and feel. According to me our subconscious mind is the mother of our conscious mind. Our subconscious and conscious mind works when we communicate with ourselves. We meet our true selves when we practice Soliloquy (state of mind in which we talk to ourselves). My work is about subconscious, conscious and Soliloquy. 

Bio: Zareen is Lahore based Visual Artist done her BFA from College of Art and Design, University of the Punjab Lahore in 2014 and after that done her MFA (visual arts) in 2019 and awarded with Gold Medal. During her graduation won different competitions nationally. She has participated in many group shows nationally. She was also the part of Karbath second wave residency in 2019 and also participated in collateral exhibition of Lahore biennale 02. She has been awarded with the “Merit of Excellence” in the group show of Punjab Artist Association of Pakistan at Alhamra Art Gallery Lahore. 

TINY TALKS WITH LORELEI BACHT

Tiny Talks is an interview series with Tiny Spoon’s talented contributors. This week we spoke with Lorelei Bacht from Issue 8, Cut/Copy/Paste: The Original! Read her poems, “Pond/Reflecting” and “The fancy dress is hung. The wedding ring is lost” in our eighth issue!

Tiny Spoon: What kindles your creativity?

Lorelei: Raw emotion. Something rises that needs to voice itself. I invent a storyline to allow the emotion to shape its own song. Every poem is a carefully crafted music box that houses an indomitable spark of emotion. Even when the stories are made up (they often are), the psychological core of the poem is always absolutely truthful.

Tiny Spoon: Are there any artists/ heroines/ idols/ friends that you look up to?

Lorelei: have not yet recovered from discovering “Ariel” as a young person. By some kind of accident, I bought an old cassette (what even is a cassette?) of Sylvia Plath reading from her work at a garage sale. I can still remember the humming of the tape (I had to buy a cassette player), the click, and then: her voice, throaty, cutting, intelligent, splendid.

Tiny Spoon: Are there any natural entities that move your work?

Lorelei: I have always been very interested in animal consciousness. I am constantly reading, observing how animals behave and trying to imagine what it feels like to have, say, the body of a spider. How do you hold on to your web? How does it feel to feed when you do not have teeth and need to liquefy the body of another? It is fascinating to me.

Tiny Spoon: We love insight into the creative process. Could you share what it is like for you,
either with your work that appears in Tiny Spoon or in general?

Lorelei: I enjoy conducting little experiments, collages, erasures, etc. The “pond / reflecting” series started as a “minimal sonnets” (14 lines of 14 words each). I find tight formal constraints amusing, and welcome the bizarrely beautiful results they yield.

Tiny Spoon: Do you have any current or future projects that you are working on that you
would like to share?

Lorelei: Several potential collections seem to have appeared organically in my recent work, but I am not in a hurry to formalize them into anything or release them into the world. Each one is a place, a container into which I pour various issues and emotions, and listen to what echoes. I am not done with my visits.

Tiny Spoon: What book, artwork, music, etc., would you recommend to others?

Lorelei: I am unshakably obsessed with “Carrie & Lowell”, the music album in which Sufjan Stevens relates his mother’s death. The honesty, courage and beauty of it is absolutely stupendous.

Tiny Spoon: Is there anything else you would like others to know about you, your creations, or
beyond?

Lorelei: I enjoy listening to poetry podcasts. I live in a remote area of Asia where books are hard to find, which has led me to read less and listen more. The podcasts “Poetry Unbound” by Pádraig Ó Tuama and “Lyric Life” by Mark Scarbrough have brought me much joy.

Tiny Spoon: Is there anything else you would like others to know about you, your creations, or
beyond? Where can people learn more about what you do?

Lorelei: I make infrequent visits to Twitter (@bachtlorelei) and Instagram (@lorelei.bacht.writer).
I also have a side project called “The Cheated Wife” on Instagram: @the.cheated.wife for
sketches, and @the.cheated.wife.writes for poetic bits.

Tiny Spoon: Do you have photographs or images you would like us to share?

Lorelei: Feel free to visit @the.cheated.wife for sketches.

Issue 8 Feature: María Pedrique

Our 8th Issue is packed full of exciting artists and writers! Our blog is an extension of the issue so we can share even more experimental, beautiful work with our readers!
CRYPTO CULTURE
YOU GOOD?
INNER PEACE

Bio: María is an artist at heart, a lawyer on paper and a migrant in transit. 

Country: Chile

Instagram: @fiction_cl

Issue 8 Feature: Susana Belen

Our 8th Issue is packed full of exciting artists and writers! Our blog is an extension of the issue so we can share even more experimental, beautiful work with our readers!

Walker 1
Walker 2
Walker 3

Susana Belen is an emerging collage artist who sees her practice as a deep way of interconnection between who we are and who we were, with other eras, cultures, creatures and even to other people’s dreams and intimacy. Her imagery makes use of nature’s shapes to create surreal instants, a blink of time in our life, a not always comfortable piece, but constantly trying to reach delight in what we see, classifying her aesthetics as “pleasant weirdness”.

She works, mainly, with old books and magazines of any kind. For her, is particularly important to use what is already created, especially with materials that belonged to other people before, mainly to connect with others through invisible ties, but also, being conscious that we live in a world overcrowded with objects that we can re-use instead of discarding.

Issue 8 Feature: Kathryn Kenworth

Our blog is an extension of the issue so we can share even more experimental, beautiful work with our readers!
Club Price”
“Cuts Like A Knife”
“Bento and Chair”

Bio: Kathryn Kenworth is based in Oakland California who makes collage work that uses imagery from junk mail to make pieces that question consumer ideas of value and exchange.

Issue 8 Feature: “In Memory of Chills” by Sarah Jane Justice

Our 8th Issue is packed full of exciting artists and writers! Our blog is an extension of the issue so we can share even more experimental, beautiful work with our readers!

Process Note: In trying to clear my house of clutter, I have discovered how many items I keep for the pure sentimental value that they hold. While the most important of them will always have their place, there’s no way I could possibly keep them all.

These gloves came from a time in my life that was characterised by spontaneity and, for a lack of a better word, wildness. I hold them and remember myself running through wind and rain, laughing and tugging on the hands of whatever co-conspirator I had roped along with me. I remember those days with joyful fondness, while still being glad that my life has since settled down. I’ll never wear these gloves again, just as I’ll likely never spend another night running through the elements on a whim. When I found myself struggling to justify keeping them, I decided to turn them into a monument.

Dissected like a bug-catcher’s butterfly, these gloves now stand in memory of the wild nights through which I wore them. I can look at this piece and remember the wind in my hair, the laughter and giddiness of acting on pure impulse. Instead of gathering dust in a box, they are taxidermized and displayed, in memory of the chills.

Bio: Sarah Jane Justice is deeply fascinated with humanity, which has led her to write, speak, sing, and create.