Submissions

ISSUE 3: CONSUMPTION

consumption issue 3

We’re currently taking submissions for our first ever themed issue CONSUMPTION due out Fall 2019! Work that adheres to the theme in its vastness will have the best chances of acceptance.

This issue will also feature a recipe contest (food recipe, poetic recipe, hybrid essay, recipe for disaster, etc.). More details forthcoming.


Tiny Spoon accepts submissions on a rolling basis. Please send all submissions directly to our email: tinyspoonlitmag@gmail.com. 

Our guidelines are below. Please take a moment to review them before submitting. We look forward to reading your work!

What We Look For:

Here at Tiny Spoon, we are especially interested in experimental work, although not exclusively. If you’ve had trouble finding a home for your work because it doesn’t fit into generally recognized categories, chances are your home is right here with us.

We seek work that pushes the boundaries of conventional genres; work that is daring, experimental, innovative, quirky, thoughtful, vulnerable, electric, eccentric. In other words, your inner workings expanded and exposed, raw and immediate; your fragile soul parted at the seams into our bound paper glossary of tiny wonder. Your voice is beautiful, edgy, infinite, and unique, and we want to raise it.

Guidelines:

  1. Format text: sent as .doc, .docx, .rtf, or .pdf
  2. Art: .jpeg or .tif
  3. Please label the file “Last Name_Title of Work”
  4. Length per piece: 1,000 words max
  5. Font: 12 pt Garamond or a similar font
  6. Up to three pieces per submission. Any additional work after the first three will not be reviewed.
  7. Simultaneous submissions allowed. Please let us know if it is published elsewhere.
  8. Submissions are free!
  9. Contributors will receive a complimentary contributor copy of the issue they are featured in.
  10. Please provide a one sentence bio about yourself.
  11. Cover letters are not required, but you may send one if you’d like. We won’t show preference based on this.

Issue 2: Erasure Contest

erasure contest

In addition to our usual submissions, we will also include an erasure/blackout poetry contest. Consider work that redacts text: think the black lines through certain sections of found/your text. Another way to approach erasure is considering the loss within texts: think Anne Carson’s If Not, Winter.